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Ignoring domination of fossil fuels is not ‘hopeful’.

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

17 July, 2017

Dear Editor:

Shamubeel Eaqub (9 July, World hope springs eternal) says, “… we should be mindful of the costs of growth on the environment and climate change . . .”, then ignores the most challenging aspect of that. Read the rest of this entry »


Trump is scamming us on energy technology

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

7 June, 2017

Dear Editor:

Picking up on a comment here and there from Donald Trump, and reading between the lines of some others, it is possible to see the scammer at work here. Read the rest of this entry »


Nostalgia is for pre climate change world

The Editor,  The Wellingtonian,  Wellington

15 May, 2017

Dear Editor:

Gordon Campbell (11 May) wonders what sort of myth of ‘real New Zealand’ will be popular with voters in September or even whether these attempts at image by the political parties will be successful at all. The images he sees in train are old ones, what he calls ‘social nostalgia’.

All good, but the nostalgia for the past also must be seen in a longer, deeper context in order to understand the NZ politics of 2017, or 2008, or even 1984. This has been a time of fundamental change, and has been recognized as such globally in one way or another since the 60’s and has been a factor in politics since the 70’s.

Adding to the threat of nuclear weapons, the assault on the earth, which in recent years has become understood through climate change science, had revealed the need for fundamental change the scope of which is terrifying to a majority, not just the professed deniers. The nostalgia which is having the most political impact is the desperate insistence in NZ that we ‘go slow on climate change’ and in the USA to take the lead in putting it out of mind altogether.

Sincerely,

Richard Keller

 

 


Continuing response to Brian Easton

Brian,

Yes psychology is involved, but your reference to a response being ‘unlocked’ is a good observation which should be a catalyst to look more broadly than psychology.  To understand the Trump, Brexit, etc phenomina requires a sociological look.  Individuals need to be understood in a sociological sense as well as a psychological sense.  This type of effect should be expected to be more prominant in times of fundamental change and fast change which we are in today.

I recently saw an academic role I’ve never heard of which may be useful for looking at this sociological, or cultural, angle:   sociocutural anthropologist

What do you think?


response to discussion of Shelly Bay proposal in Lindsay Shelton’s article on Scoop

What discussion has been had elsewhere about the future of sea water incursion along Shelly Bay?  Read the rest of this entry »


Conspiracy theory accusations are growing, version 2

The Editor,  The Listener,  Private Bag 92512,  Wellesley St.,  Auckland 1141

18 April, 2017

Dear Editor,

Attempts to denigrate critics with the accusation of ‘conspiracy theory’ are growing. Not that it is an unknown tactic; in fact it is time honoured.  Read the rest of this entry »


Accusations of ‘conspiracy theory’ are growing

The Editor,  The Listener,

Private Bag 92512,  Wellesley St.

Auckland 1141

15 April, 2017

Dear Editor,

Attempts to denigrate critics with the accusation of ‘conspiracy theory’ are growing. Not that it is an unknown tactic; in fact it is time honoured.  Read the rest of this entry »