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Post from A.C. Stark, UK

First, Rebel Against Yourself.

In Owen Jones’ recent interview video with Extinction Rebellion, Roger Hallam criticises the political ‘left’ as having been perpetually dishonest about what economic action is required to mitigate the climate breakdown and what cultural changes this will necessitate. He contends that the ‘left’ have become so embroiled, so entrenched in the (conceptually politically right-wing) neoliberal ideal they are unable to conceive of human life “in anything other than cost-benefit, materialistic terms”. Their proposed resolutions have therefore assumed that market forces are enough to tackle climate change: business as usual WILL work, it just needs tweaking! They were wrong, whilst Roger is correct: The ‘left’ – the supposed political guardians of justice and equality – have fundamentally failed to realise that at the very heart of any suitable action to mitigating the climate breakdown requires a redefinition and restructuring of our society and economy. Just like all life on this planet, justice and equality depend upon this for their survival.

It can feel as though we need to go through our very own personal extinction in order to prevent a global one.

So, the political ‘left’ need to become Left again. For many of us, this has long been clear to see. Thankfully, it appears that they’re (just) starting to see the light. But we, and they, need to be clear about what the necessary changes in our society will require of us culturally and personally. Roger was unequivocal about this. It requires us to accept, moreover embrace, lower standards of living. For freeing ourselves from our capitalist indoctrination involves repudiating everything tied up in capitalism’s tautological relationship with growth. So we must retract from our supposed inter-generational contract with every consecutive generation to give them a better standard of living than the previous (I say ‘supposed’ because I’ve never seen nor signed this thing). It’s a faulty contract, the objectives of which cannot be sustained by virtue of its very design. We pursue its fulfilment in vain, and at what price? At best, the end of civil society, justice and equality; at worst, the end of human existence altogether.

Therefore, we need to redefine ourselves, every one of us; we need to change our expectations of what life entails. Reducing our standard of living involves changing a whole host of our own personal life-defining ideas. We need to be willing to fully extend the service life of everything we own, instead of repeatedly repurchasing unnecessary replacements. We need to re-skill ourselves so as not to be reliant on corporate manufacturers. We need to be canny, creative and imaginative. And we can be! We must reuse, recycle, repair and adapt our clothes again and again and again, until they are literally unusable as objects of clothing; and then up-cycle them into rags and quilts. We must re-green and re-wild our concreted areas, reconnect with the wilderness, walk upon, re-learn, appreciate and cultivate our privately owned microcosmic lands. We must localise ourselves (without vulgarising ourselves into xenophobes), so that we can walk, push or cycle ourselves to work, the grocer, to our friends and families. Concede that animal husbandry is one of the greatest causes of environmental degradation, and thus accept that meat ought to be reserved for special occasions, or better yet not be consumed at all. Accept that we needn’t pollute our drains with noxious chemicals when we wash ourselves and our possessions; realise that we needn’t shower every single day in order to be sanitary.

And this needn’t amount to austerity as we currently understand it – as a degrading, unrelenting existence at the margins of civilisation, wherein nothing possesses beauty or meaning. Kings and queens of empires old had austere lives compared to many of us. Ingenuity in practical utility can be appreciated in aesthetic terms. Yes, the story, the history and destiny, and the scars of our possessions can cause us to marvel over them, giving them aesthetic merit. Further still, in the process of changing ourselves, our conceptions of objective perfection will entirely evaporate, but the ‘civil’ part our civilisation will not. THAT is what we are doing this for. There is meaning in all this. So, don’t mistake reduced ‘living standards’ for reduced ‘quality of life.’ They are very different things. Happiness and contentment are in this imagined society, and can wholly be found in the process of transitioning to it.

I’ve said it before: the changes required will not be easy. We will all experience some strife in the process of challenging and changing ourselves. I’ve experienced it myself, and last week I met many people at the Extinction Rebellion protests in London that had, are or were beginning to experience their own internal mental rebellions: I am not you anymore, I am someone else; I wish there was another way but there isn’t, so leave me be! This internal, somewhat subconscious self-rejection is relentlessly tiring because redefining ourselves, re-finding ourselves is a tortuous task. There is no physicality to this kind of lost-ness; we are truly alone in an ethereally grievous mental-state. Those who’ve experienced it may now know very little about who they are, but they have realised that our self-image is inextricably bound up in our culture, and that culture has been hogtied by a now rotting politico-economic system. For us, denouncing this system is like pronouncing in the 19th century that “God is dead”. It can feel as though we are left in possession of nothing, yet still have everything to lose. It can feel as though we need to go through our very own personal extinction in order to prevent a global one.

Yet there is something that keeps us going. There is hope. There is solidarity and love. More importantly, there is a new social contract to draw up, and quickly. Its objectives may just about be attainable, if we really try; if we continue to rebel. This contract won’t catalyse injustice, inequality and global extinction. No, neither will this contract aspire to give our future generations a better standard of living. Instead, it will aspire to give them life. No luxuries. Just food to eat and air to breathe. In essence, that’s all Extinction Rebellion are asking for: that we allow our children to live.

Viva la Rebellion.

A.C. Stark

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Post Truth in public transport at Wellington Regional Council

The Editor,  The Cook Strait News,  Wellington

04 August, 2018

Dear Editor:

Herwin Bongers of Revolt Wellington makes the astute observation that New Zealand (that is, Wellington) is the only country signed up to the Paris Accord that has since removed sustainable public transport (trolley buses). Read the rest of this entry »


What ‘problems’ are millennials trying to solve?

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

31 March, 2017

Dear Editor:

In John McCrone’s article on the ‘millennial mind’ (26 March) Sylvia Nissen says millennials’ ability to analyse life and break down problems into small achievable goals is highly sophisticated. But what are the ‘problems’ they are addressing?  Read the rest of this entry »


The term “populism” is a distraction.

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

27 December, 2016

Dear Editor:

Much is being said about the ‘populism’ of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. But that term is a distraction.  Read the rest of this entry »


Shop til you drop, cover, and hold

The Editor,  The Wellingtonian,  Wellington

22 November, 2016

Dear Editor:

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester has used the government’s cliché mantra of ‘get them back shopping, get them back working’ approach to earthquake threats. Though it would be fair to say that weeks of delay would be discouraging, applying it to Wellington’s current situation, not knowing how much damage there has been, to come back within a day or two shows more of an inclination to neo-liberal correctness than to an understanding of how people are actually feeling and to the realities of the shaky isles. Read the rest of this entry »


Collins, poverty and consumerism

The Editor,  The Dominion Post,  Wellington,

26 October, 2016

Dear Editor:

It would appear that Judith Collins is the real leader of the National government when she can get away with such grossly misleading comments about the connection between crime and poverty. John Key is just a front man. Read the rest of this entry »


Joe Hill – lyric

Joe Hill

(lyric, as sung at memorial service for Helen Kelly, 28 October, 2016)

 

I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night, alive as you and me

Says I, but Joe, you are ten years dead

I never died, said he. I never died, said he.

 

The Copper Bosses killed you Joe, they shot you Joe, says I

Takes more than guns to kill a man

Says Joe, I didn’t die, says Joe, I didn’t die

 

And standing there as big as life, smiling with his eyes

Says Joe, what they can never kill

Went on to organize, went on to organize

 

From San Diego up to Maine, in every mine and mill

Where (working men organize/ workers strike and organize)

It’s there you’ll find Joe Hill, it’s there you’ll find Joe Hill

 

I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night, alive as you and me

Says I, but Joe, you are ten years dead

I never died, said he. I never died, said he.