MAIN MENU

There is no ‘generation’ war

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

18 March, 2017

Dear Editor:

Nadine Chalmers-Ross (12 March) says she wants to sort out differences between ‘boomer’ and ‘millennial’ generations, then rips along with the shallow clichés used by those who want to make this a generational war. Is this provocation or ignorance?  Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

‘Globalization’ is a misused term.

16 February, 2017

The Editor,  The Listener,  letters@listener.co.nz,  Auckland

Dear Editor:

The term ‘globalization’ has been a misused, even cynically used, term since the Sixties when it was proposed as a move away from ‘nationalism’ (read ‘colonialism’) which had produced two world wars in the first half of the 20th century.  Read the rest of this entry »


The term ‘globalization’ is misused in blaming immigrants (short version)

The Editor,  The Dominion Post,  Wellington

04 March, 2017

Dear editor,

So called ‘globalization’ was never intended to benefit people actually living in their own land, and certainly not those who have been forced out of theirs. It was always intended to maximize the profits of global corporations by freeing up capital without freeing up labour, thus victimizing labour in a race to the bottom of wages and conditions of employment. Read the rest of this entry »


Key was never more than a front man.

The Editor,  The Sunday Star Times,  Auckland

07 December, 2016

Dear Editor:

John Key lasted a year longer than I expected; I’ll give him that. But his demise goes back two years to the 2014 election and the stoush that followed from Nicky Hager’s book, Dirty Politics, out of which Judith Collins was sent to the bench for a while. Read the rest of this entry »


Pike River picket

12 November 2016

The Editor,  The Greymouth Star,  Greymouth

Dear Editor:

Labour MP Trevor Mallard said it clearly at the Helen Kelly memorial in Wellington –  How could he have just accepted from Pike River managers that the mine was being run with utmost safety standards?    He is not alone, of course, in wondering.  Read the rest of this entry »


Response to Gordon Campbell’s article on Trump

Appropriate to mention that Trump asked in a military briefing why he couldn’t use nuclear weapons. Does he not know that military and nuclear strategists have long put forth the ‘nuclear deterrence’ theory?  He should have known that would be the response.  There is some (probably unintended) honesty about his question as there is no such thing as ‘nuclear deterrence’; that is just a figment of a collective insanity.  But he is surely serious about using them.  Ever since the end of the cold war it has been universally understood that there is no reason to have them except to use them.

So where would he use them? North Korea? It’s hard for me to guess.  If the use offends or threatens some large nuclear power, such as China or Russia, it would not surprize to see them respond with a nuclear blast somewhere.  The target?  Likely some country out of the way, small, and an ally of the USA.  Oh, and just for good measure, an anti-nuclear country; nuclear nations see anti-nuclear as a threat.  Just a thought.

(addendum 12/11/16)

Gordon,
Good of you to remind us that Trump is willing to encourage other countries to develop nuclear weapons.  Would that become another export industry?  Does this display a lack of understanding of the destructiveness of a nuclear weapon?  Or is it a sign of suicidal tendencies?  More the latter I think.
Those who see that the global economy is dominated by profiteers who benefit from perpetual war are not wrong.  But that misses the discussion of the larger cultural/historical flow and the point which is coming to a zenith today.  I think we all know what that big picture is but we are almost universally terrified of discussing it.


Submission on Open Government

This is a last minute, short, one item submission to the consultation on Open Government:

Hi Martin,
Apologies for such a short statement at the last minute today.
The most important thing that NZ could do to promote open government would be to narrow the criteria and limit the use of “urgency” by government.  A government is not elected to be a dictator but this government is using their popularity to shove through much important legislation that deserves a national discussion, even clearly unpopular legislation.  Urgency is meant to keep the government working, not to shut off debate.

Richard Keller